Posts Tagged ‘United States’


 
There will be more indoor vendor spaces and a larger swap meet (thanks to the Bombers). There will (hopefully) be antique tractors hauling people around. There will be great pre and post show parties in Clinton (that’s Friday AND Saturday nights, folks!!). Since this is our big 10th anniversary, we went all out with the bands, too! We even got one of the bands who played the very first Hunnert Car Pileup to come back (The Gravetones)!

Junior Brown
3 Bad Jacks
The Reckless Ones
Art Adams
Hot Rod Hucksters
Th’Empires
The Gravetones
MG & the Gas City 3

It will be a killer show worthy of the 10 year anniversary…

It will also be the last Hunnert Car Pileup.

This was a very hard decision to reach. The Chrome Czars have devoted 10 years of their lives to this show, and we have an emotional attachment to it. We debated (and argued) about what to do, but finally decided that ending the show was best. It was time.

There are a variety of reasons behind the decision, and we struggled with it, but we feel the show is going in the wrong direction. It’s becoming more about the spectators and it’s getting harder to keep out cars that are not truly traditional. Fun for all, sure, but no longer the original intent of the show. The show’s “vibe” has been dimming and drifting as a result. We’d rather kill it while we still respect it, than let it go down in a smoldering wreck. 10 years is enough, and there are several other traditional car shows now that can carry the torch.

Furthermore, as the show grew, it became harder for us to manage it, even with the help of the Great Red Shirt Army. The strain on our day jobs and families started to turn the show from a Labor of Love to just Labor. We are not professional promoters.

A long time ago, we decided that we would rather stop doing the show, than to see it lose “the vibe” that made it so special. So, we would rather end it now while that vibe is still flowing through the show, and maintain its integrity.

For now, we are going to concentrate our energies on the Hunnert Car Heads Up vintage drag race event. There have been many shows that started because they were inspired by the Pileup, just like the Pileup was inspired by the Lonestar Roundup and the original Billetproof. The traditional hot rod flame is burning brightly in these shows. Go to the Blacktop Barons’ Road Block. Go to Vintage Torque Fest. Go to the Symco Shakedown. Go to the Rust Revival. Go to the Heads Up and Meltdown Drag Races. These are just a few of the shows in the Midwest.

We would like to thank the hundreds of volunteers in the Red Shirt Army who have donated countless hours over the years to making this show happen. They are the heart of the show. Thanks to the hot rodders who drove their cars from all over the USA and came to the show in the cold, rain, heat, and even snow. Thanks to all the spectators who were so inspired by what they saw that they returned the next year with a car they could drive through the gate. Thanks to the rat rods and street rods who challenged our interpretation of “traditional” every year and kept us on our toes. Thanks to the towns of Sycamore, Morris, Decatur and Clinton for welcoming all the crazy hot rodders over the years, and thanks to those rodders for keeping it peaceful and clean. And a special thanks to our families and friends for helping make this show happen, especially Catherine (DW) and Diane, who go that extra mile in planning the event.

We wanted to make this announcement in advance for all of you who keep saying “I’ll get the car done later. There’s always next year.” Not this time, friend. GET WRENCHING!!

Celebrate 10 years of the Hunnert Car Pileup on Oct 8, 2011. It will be an event that you’ll be telling your grand kids about!

Don’t miss it!!

 
 
Advertisements

Despite his genius and popularity, Dutch never made any money from striping. Money was something he detested. In this quote from a 1965 article Dutch explains his thoughts on money.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“I make a point of staying right at the edge of poverty. I don’t have a pair of pants without a hole in them, and the only pair of boots I have are on my feet. I don’t mess around with unnecessary stuff, so I don’t need much money. I believe it’s meant to be that way. There’s a ‘struggle’ you have to go through, and if you make a lot of money it doesn’t make the ‘struggle’ go away. It just makes it more complicated. If you keep poor, the struggle is simple.” – Von Dutch

Every so often he would double his rate just to weed out the undesirables. So many were demanding his services that he just couldn’t stand it anymore.   It didn’t work! No matter what he charged, they just kept on coming! He hated the commercial aspects of what he did. He believed that you couldn’t focus on doing good work if you worried about the money, and ‘good work’ was everything to Dutch!

Von Dutch was a multitalented artist. In addition to pinstriping, ha was also a gunsmith, kustom painter, knife maker, sign painter, inventor, customizer, and a fine artist. Von Dutch also did a lot of special effects for movies, and was a consultant for period movies because he was a gun expert. The man was a genius, and could make something out of anything. He was mostly interested in motorcycles, but did also customize some cars. One of the cars he restyled was based on a Cord and a Cadillac, so he named it the “Cordillac”. Another automotive creation by Von Dutch was his truck the “Kenford”.

Von Dutch was known as an eccentric artist. In an interview with Hot Rod Magazine March 1977 he tells about a guy visiting his shop bugging him to stripe his car. He really got him mad, so he decided to give him a little surprise, as he put cobwebs and spiders all over his car. Another customer who was foolish enough to pressure Von Dutch into a quick job he didn’t want to do got a striping job that wouldn’t dry, as Von Dutch had mixed a lot of oil into the paint. In Hot Rod Magazine April 1989 Pat Ganahl also tells stories about a fire truck Von Dutch was hired to do traditional pinstripng on for a station in Arizona. Once completed Von Dutch had flamed the truck instead. When racers brought him grille inserts from Model A’s or 32s, half the time he would stripe them upside down. Pat had also heard a story about a customer that got a car striped. When the customer got back to the shop Von Dutch had pinstriped one side of the car differently than the other. When brought the car back to Von Dutch, Von Dutch would tell him: “Who can see both sides of your car at the same time? Why should they be the same? This way, you get two different designs on your car to enjoy for the price of one”.Also if somebody tried to dicker on price, Von Dutch would raise the figure instead of lowering it.

Von Dutch got a little too moody and eccentric for Barris Kustoms, so he moved his operation uptown to “The Crazy Arab’s” Competition Body Shop at 7201 West Beverly Boulevard in Los Angeles in 1955.  After Von Dutch moved, George Barris asked Dean Jeffries, aka “The Kid” if he would sublease a shop space in the Barris Kustoms Lynwood shop. Dean Jeffries used to hang around Von Dutch in the beginning of his career. In the book Dean Jeffries 50 Fabulous Years in Hot Rods, Racing and Film Dean admits that it was Von Dutch that learned him to pinstripe. As Dean spent a lot of time around Von Dutch, the duo became known as Von Dutch and “The Kid”. Before Dean “Jeff” Jeffries rented space at the Barris Kustoms shop he was working out of George Cerny’s Custom Shop.

In 1955 Von Dutch made a personal appearance at the 1955 Motorama where he striped a 1927 Studebaker for 10 days, he achieved national fame in Car Craft February 1956.

According to his sister Virginia Howard Reyes most of the stories being told about Von Dutch are just stories. Some are somewhat true, but almost all of the stories on him are all different because he never gave a straight answer, and liked to play with you. When he told you something, you believed it, and he got a kick out of it. According to Virginia he never lied, he hated liars, and was very honest. He wasn’t eccentric as a young boy, but since he was quite different from the norm, his family always knew he had something special in him.

After a controller from the building inspector’s office started bugging Von Dutch for having antiquated machinery in his shop, he decided to move into a 1954 public transportation bus, since there is nothing in the vehicle code  that says anything about how old the machinery can be.

One of the things Von Dutch enjoyed doing most was building and working on machinery. Building an engine from scratch, see it grow, have it make heat, and power, would beat Frankenstein’s monster to Von Dutch.

Born in 1929 as Kenneth Howard, Von Dutch was the man who brought pin-striping as a high art from motorcycles to automobile bodies. He took his nickname from his stubbornness. “Stubborn as a Dutchman” is a by now quaint ethnic slur. But beyond stubborn, Von Dutch became insufferable. He was the quintessential cliché romantic artist, selfish inside his own vision, alienating family, friends and customers alike. Part romantic, part beatnik, part general pain in the ass, he was a racist and prima donna, he managed to irritate almost everyone who admired him—and in the best esthetic mode, somehow made them admire him more in the process.

He died in 1992, leaving two daughters. At the end, he was drinking heavily, holed up in an old Long Beach city bus. For years he lived at the museum called Movie World, Cars of the Stars and Planes of Fame in Buena Park, California. He had become paranoid and he spent time elaborately engraving and painting knives and guns as well as cars.

 Michael Cassel, a maker of surf clothing, established a company called Von Dutch Originals in 2000 and opened the store on Melrose Avenue a year later. He brought in a man named Tony Sorensen who in turn hired designer Christian Audigier. Audigier worked for Diesel and Fiorucci. Casel’s notion was to tap the hot rod set; but Sorensen and Audigier aimed at wider, fashion audience.

From what he have heard through the grapevine the clothing line was started by his daughters  in 1996 with Michael Cassel with the rights being sold in 2000 and  Tony tossing Cassel out around 2001. The  family business the “family”  honestly,made NO money compared to what that company made and is still making.

No discussion of Von Dutch would be complete without touching on the subject of his famous Flying Eyeball logo. According to Von Dutch, the flying eyeball originated with the Macedonian and Egyptian cultures about 5000 years ago. It was a symbol meaning “the eye in the sky knows all and sees all”, or something like that. Dutch got a hold of this symbol and modified it into the flyin’eyeball we know of today. He always believed in reincarnation, and the eyeball, somehow, was tied to that.There have been numerous “incarnations” of this design over the years. It still remains an icon of the ’50s and ’60s street rod crowd.


vintage tattoo postcard Al Schiefley Les Skuse

Dueling tattoo legends & bosom buddies– Al Schiefley (left) & Les Skuse (right)
Yep.  On a tattoo kick again.  Check out these sick pics and you’ll know why.  This ain’t no Miami Ink — this is Olde School, Hard-Ass Tats.
The legendary tattooist, and founder of the Sandusky Tattoo Club, Al Schiefley lived and worked out of Sandusky, Ohio where he opened his famous Pearl Street shop that dutifully operated for over a quarter of a century.  The photo above was taken back in mid 1950s during Al’s travels abroad, and shows him seemingly double-teaming a well-inked young lady (with a strange sense of humor) alongside his host and fellow tattoo master — Les Skuse, President of the famed Bristol Tattoo Club.  While in Bristol, Al had the honor of being tattooed by Skuse, as well as the respected London tattooist, Rich Mingins.
Les Skuse tattoo parlor
 
The Skuse family have a rich heritage in the art of tattooing — dating back well over 80 years. It all started with founder Les Skuse, who started the Bristol business back in 1928. Through his years of inking that brought him recognition in Bristol and abroad, Les Skusee was ultimately awarded the title of Champion Tattoo Artist of all England for his advancements in tattoo artistry and techniques.

Les Skuse

This 1950s pic of Les Skuse and members of the Bristol Tattoo Club shows them holding their club’s calling card. For recognition purposes, every member is secretly inked somewhere on their body with the club insignia — a black bat.
From The Skuse Family History–
Les Skuse was born, lived and died in the port town of Bristol, England. He became the town’s most famous tattoo export and was almost as well known on American shores as he was at home. He visited the United States in 1956 and corresponded with many American tattooists. He was a big admirer of the Coleman School of tattooing as practiced by Paul Rodgers, Huck Spaulding, Al Schiefley and others.
In 1956, Skuse stated in a letter: “English tattooists were using a single needle. This caused a lot of bleeding and pain. This finished design looked very thin and scratchy when compared with the strong, well-shaded designs done in the United States.”
tattoo parlor vintage postcard
 
The right-handed Skuse started his tattoo career in 1928 at the shop of Joseph Hartley, who was probably Bristol’s one and only tattoo artist before Skuse. Hartley was a long time tattooist/supplier in this area and was located at 2 Blackfields, near Stokes Croft, Bristol, England.
Skuse stated: “Professor Joe Hartley fixed me up with a Japanese hand tattooing outfit, and began to work on some of my friends. It was not long before I had earned the price of a six-volt combination tattoo machine.” Skuse is said to have stayed with Hartley until World War II, when he enlisted in the Royal Artillery. After five years of tattooing the troops, he got out, settled back into Bristol and opened his first shop. Les Skuse was located in at least three different storefronts in Bristol; 57 and 97 Lower Ashley Road, and 71 Mina Road.
 
Bristol Tattoo Club Les Skuse
 
Undoubtedly two of the major accomplishments that etched Les Skuse’s name into tattoo history were the formation of the British Guild of Tattooing and the Bristol Tattoo Club. These organizations were given worldwide publicity by both the British and overseas presses, and kept Skuse in the limelight during the 1950s.
Riding on this wave of popularity, Skuse was voted the Champion Tattoo Artist of All England in 1955. The next few years brought an international exchange of tattoo ideas, with Skuse visiting the U.S., and Milton Zeis and Al Schiefley visiting England.
Les Skuse died in 1973. The most fitting tribute I can find for Les Skuse died from a 1957 letter: “I have always been ready and willing to learn, never thinking I knew it all and continually searching for ways in which to improve my work and equipment. It is my firm belief that the more tattooists meet, correspond and exchange ideas, the better it will be both for the individual and the profession.”
article_image-image-article
When Les Skuse died in 1973, Les Skuse Junior (Danny) took over his shop on Mina Road. Danny worked up to 1990 when he retired from the day to day running of the studio. He did however decide to work along side his lifelong friend Ron Ackers of Portsmouth and traveled around the world working at conventions, which he is still doing today. Danny is Jimmie’s Father and Brother of Billy.
At the time when Danny took over the Mina Road shop, Les Skuse Senior’s other son Billy was tattooing in Aldershot, Hampshire, alongside his wife Rusty Skuse, who was featured in the Guinness Book Of Records for being the most tattooed woman in England. Billy is Jimmy’s Uncle and Brother of Danny.
Jimmie Skuse started tattooing over 30 years ago when he worked alongside his father Danny at the age of thirteen. Jimmie established the Temple Street shop in 2004. Prior to that he worked as a guest artist in many studios throughout the West of England. Jimmie is the Grandson of Les Skuse.
danny billy skuse al schiefley
Les Skuse Bristol Tattoo Club
 
les skuse tattoo parlor vintage postcard
les skuse bristol tattoo clubles skuse bristol tattoo club
 
Les Skuse tattoo parlor
les skuseLes Skuse
 

 Janet "Rusty" Skuse

The legendary Janet “Rusty” Skuse
 

tattoo postcard ron ackers

Another English tattoo legend – Ron Ackers


Saturday, October 8th, 2011

The Hunnert Car Pileup is a car show for hot rodders who build their cars, and drive them. The Pileup is about hanging out, meeting new friends, and seeing old ones. It is about checking out the craftsmanship in others’ cars, and showing off your own. It is about great music, art, and finding that rare part. It is a nod to a bygone era that lives in each of us. It is about the drive there, the drive home, and the story that goes in between.

2011 will mark our 10th Pileup, and the 11th Anniversary of the founding of Chrome Czars Motor Club, so we are making this a special show!

There will be:

* A KILLER line-up of musicians (see below)!

* A 1927 Kenworth customized in 1963 for the stage!

* Special HCPU OK! stickers for show cars!

* Hot rod movies at the pre and post-show parties at Snappers!

* Limited Edition Hunnert Car Pileup Posters!

* Antique tractors pulling wagons around the spectator parking lot and show area!

* An ever-expanding swap meet and vendor area!

* More tents, and picnic tables made at the local prison!

We hope to see you there!

Thanks,
The Chrome Czars Motor Club,
www.chromeczars.com

Since  this is our 10th Anniversary we went all out on entertaiment and lined up some really great acts from all over the USA!

Friday – the only Official Pre-Show Party – 9pm
Snappers Bar in Clinton, IL – only a 15 minute drive from the show and hotels!

Three Bad Jacks (Los Angeles, CA) This full throttle trio fuses the best parts of rock, punk and rockabilly into a unique sound. If you’ve ever seen a band on fire on stage (literally!!), then you’ll know why we brought these guys all the way out from the land where hot rodding was born!

Hot Rod Hucksters (Chicago) These guys forge an unholy sonic amalgamation of Eddie Cochran, Johnny Burnette, The Cramps, and some say the Stray Cats. Featuring members of the Chrome Czars and Blacktop Barons car clubs. (photo courtesy of Kim Petersen)

Th’Empires (Bloomington, IN) – It’s hard to describe a band that infuses the raw distortion of garage rock and rockabilly rythmns with the frantic jump of the blues, especially when it’s only one guy! If you missed Hasil Adkins back in the ’50s, then you need to check out Th’Empires. (photo courtesy of Molly Burkett)

♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦    ♦

Saturday at the Hunnert Car Pileup, Progress City USA, NOON

Junior Brown (Austin, TX) Grammy-nominated, guitar-designing, country & western star Junior Brown! If you haven’t heard “Highway Patrol” just wait until you hear the man himself play it next to a ’55 Chevy police car on a stage pulled by a ’27 Kenworth customized in ’63 for the hot rod show circuit. It will knock the grease right out of your hair.

Art Adams (Indianapolis, IN) This original 1950s’ rockabilly recording star came out of retirement a few years ago and got a band together. This cat still has what it takes to rock the house! Get out your dancing shoes, dad.

The Reckless Ones (Minneapolis, MN) This is one super tight rockabilly band with incredibly catchy hooks that go along with a great stage show. If you miss 1980′s Neorockabilly bands like The Quakes, Polecats, Restless, and the Stray Cats, then you’ll want to be up front and center when these guys take the stage.

Saturday Night – the one and only Official Weekend-Ending Blowout Post-Show Party @ Snappers – 9pm

The Gravetones (Chicago, IL) For everyone who laments missing the very first Hunnert Car Pileup 10 years ago at Marty & Sons Body Shop, then here is your chance to relive those days. The Gravetones tore up the makeshift stage (and floor) at the first Pileup with what may be best described as a mix of the Misfits, Cramps, and Elvis… in other words, great rock and roll! They’re the ONLY band that played the first Pileup that’s still around.

MG & the Gas City 3 (Indianapolis, IN) These guys kick out some hard-driving rockabilly and rock & roll. Don’t be fooled by the street rod in the photo, these guys rock! If you like the Rev. Horton Heat, you’ll dig this band.

Post Taken from: http://www.hunnertcarpileup.com/


                                                                  STUDEBAKER HISTORY

On this day in 1933, American automaker Studebaker, then heavily in debt, goes into receivership.  The company’s president, Albert Erskine, resigned and later that year committed suicide. Studebaker eventually rebounded from its financial troubles, only to close its doors for the final time in 1966.

The origins of the Studebaker Corporation date back to 1852, when brothers Henry and Clement Studebaker opened a blacksmith shop in South Bend, Indiana. Studebaker eventually became a leading manufacturer of horse-drawn wagons and supplied wagons to the U.S. Army during the Civil War. Around the turn of the century, the company entered America’s burgeoning auto industry, launching an electric car in 1902 and a gas-powered vehicle two years later that was marketed under the name Studebaker-Garford. After partnering with other automakers, Studebaker began selling gas-powered cars under its own name in 1913, while continuing to make wagons until 1920.

Albert Erskine (1871–1933) assumed the top job at Studebaker in 1915. Under his leadership, the company acquired luxury automaker Pierce-Arrow in the late 1920s and launched the affordably priced but short-lived Erskine and Rockne lines (the latter named for the famous University of Notre Dame football coach: Before his death in a plane crash in 1931, Studebaker paid Rockne to give talks at auto conventions and dealership events). During the early 1930s, Studebaker was hit hard by the Great Depression and in March 1933 it was forced into bankruptcy. (In April 2009, Chrysler became the first major American automaker since Studebaker to declare bankruptcy.) Erskine, who was saddled with personal debt and health problems, killed himself on July 1, 1933.

New management got the company back on track, dropping the Rockne brand in July 1933 and selling Pierce-Arrow, among other consolidation moves. In January 1935, the new Studebaker Corporation was incorporated. In the late 1930s, the French-born industrial designer Raymond Loewy began working for Studebaker: There, he created iconic and popular models including the bullet-nosed 1953 Starliner and Starlight coupes and the 1963 Avanti sports coupe.

By the mid-1950s, Studebaker, which didn’t have the resources of its Big Three competitors, had merged with automaker Packard and was again facing financial troubles. By the late 1950s, the Packard brand was dropped. In December 1963, Studebaker shuttered its South Bend plant, ending the production of its cars and trucks in America. The company’s Hamilton, Ontario, facilities remained in operation until March 1966, when Studebaker shut its doors for the final time after 114 years in business.



Megan Daniels: Deserves Much More

Megan Daniels is definitely not your average, all-American girl, even though her amazing blonde hair and that “sweet” smile might fool you. Megan says her friends and biggest fans mean a lot to her because of the fact that they always accept her for who she really is.


115 MPH ………………Yea Right!

The Davis was first introduced in 1947 by Glenn Gordon “Gary”  Davis in the United States of America. Just after World War II, Davis bought a small racing car that had been converted into a 3-wheeler and named the “Californian”.   Believing it would make a good economy vehicle Davis built his first prototype which he nicknamed “Baby” (or Davis D-1). The second Davis prototype D-2, (or Davis “Delta”) was also built in 1947. From 1948 the Davis Motor Company then produced 11 Divan models that all featured a removable top. 

The Davis is possibly the largest production 3-wheeler ever made being 14 feet in length and wide enough to sit four adults abreast. It was powered by a 2,600cc four-cylinder Continental engine (whilst the first two prototypes used a Hercules engine) and had an aluminium body that was attached directly to a steel chassis with normal cushion body mounts. Davis also produced a military 3-wheeler that used the same chassis and was in effect a 3-wheeled jeep.  It is not know for certain but it is believed that only two of these were made. In total only 17 Davis vehicles were made of which a number still exist in the United States. 
 
 
 The 5th Davis that was made was later shipped to the Reliant Motor Company in Tamworth (UK) for “engineering evaluation” and upon its return, never actually left the UK. The Customs Officers demanded that the customs bond be paid for the car to be sent back to America. At the time the company who owned the rights to manufacture the car were not willing/able to pay for return shipment and as Reliant did not want to pay the customs bond, Reliant was required to  “destroy the car under the eyes of the customs agents.”  Davis ceased production in 1949.


     I have found a different project I want to tackle. So I have for sale my 1966 T-Bird Town Hardtop. All original 90K mile car. This car is an excellent candidate for restoration or many parts. This is a complete never touched or molested 390 factory car. The interior is very nice it will need new door skins, carpet and head liner.Also The frame is very solid and you can see the red oxide primer from the factory under the car and in the engine bay. The front and rear frame rails are solid. The rear torque boxes are solid. The trunk has the most rust.  The car has all of the trim. The front and rear bumpers are in good condition. The car is sold as is and has a clear clean title. I have placed a battery in the car the other day and the brake lights came on the interior lights etc. The car has full power windows and power vent windows. All glass is good and the doors shut and close tight. The car has never been wrecked and is a straight car. I am asking $850.00 firm.

Car is located in Wentzville, MO 63385 – Will help load car up..

————–SOLD—————-SOLD——————SOLD————-SOLD